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oceans

258 record(s)
 
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  • The most recent field study of the Little Swanport estuary, Tasmania carried out by Crawford et al. (2006) collected monthly samples at sites throughout the estuary between January 2004 and January 2005. Measurements included water column nutrients, chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, salinity, phytoplankton, zooplankton and oyster growth. This work demonstrated that freshwater flows had a significant effect on salinity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient levels in the estuary. However, monthly sampling didn’t provide the temporal resolution necessary to detect potential flow-on effects on the biology (e.g. phytoplankton and zooplankton dynamics, oyster growth). To gain an improved understanding of the temporal dynamics of the estuary, including the response to freshwater flow, samples were collected weekly (chlorophyll-a), fortnightly (nutrients and zooplankton) and bimonthly (oysters) between March 2006 and June 2008 at a site in the lower estuary where the majority of oysters are farmed

  • Water quality and biological data was collected from four tide-dominated river estuaries indicative of catchments with varying levels of human impacts to: 1) assess draft indicator levels for water quality, and 2) investigate biological indicators of estuarine health in NW Tasmania. The data represented by this record was collected in the Duck Bay.

  • Water quality and biological data was collected from four tide-dominated river estuaries indicative of catchments with varying levels of human impacts to: 1) assess draft indicator levels for water quality, and 2) investigate biological indicators of estuarine health in NW Tasmania. The data represented by this record was collected in the Montagu River.

  • This dataset contains the traditional and effective nitrate, phosphate, and silicate fluxes in Lombok, Ombai, and Timor passages, Indian Ocean. Fluxes are depth-resolved and cross-strait integrated, for the 2004-2006 time period of the INSTANT field program. In some cases depths extend below the functional sill depths, due to the moorings being in deeper water. Negative fluxes are westward, towards the Indian Ocean. Files are in self-describing netCDF format, as follows: (1) lombok_trad.nc. Traditional nutrient fluxes for Lombok Strait. (2) lombok_eff.nc. Effective nutrient fluxes for Lombok Strait. (3) ombai_trad.nc. Traditional nutrient fluxes for Ombai Strait. (4) ombai_eff.nc. Effective nutrient fluxes for Ombai Strait. (5) timor_trad.nc. Traditional nutrient fluxes for Timor Passage. (6) timor_eff.nc. Effective nutrient fluxes for Timor Passage.

  • Data for the project -Investigating the source of the high nitrate, low oxygen layer in the Leeuwin Current- is including in the file. The data include CTD data, ADCP data and Triaxus data from RV Investigator (Voyage IN2019_V03). Also the Sea Surface Height satellite data and CSIRO Atlas of Regional Seas (CARS) data are included as the supporting data. The MATLAB code including the code that calculate the rotated velocity and the transport of the EGC current in upper 300m including volume transport, salinity transport, heat transport and oxygen transport. The nitrate data from Triaxus is uncompleted and will be upload later with the code for calculating the nitrate transport.

  • Redmap is a primarily a website that invites the community to spot, log and map marine species that are uncommon in their region, or along particular parts of their coast. The information collected is mapped and displayed on the site, demonstrating, in time, how species distributions may be changing. Sightings are divided into two categories – those with a photo that can be ‘verified’ by a marine biologist, and sightings without photos that we call community sightings (anecdotal). All the information collected, with and without photos, is mapped and will be used in the following years to map out a ‘story’ of changes occurring in our marine environment. The main data collected includes the species sighted (normally selected from a list comprising preselected species of interest), the location, date/time and activity being undertaken. Other optional information gathered include biological data such as sex, size and weight and environmental data such as water depth and temperature and habitat. This record is associated with live data (and will subsequently change over time) and spatial elements have reduced accuracy. It is also subject to a three year embargo (ie. does not contain data less than three years old). If you wish to discuss obtaining a citable, static dataset, that is current and/or contains accurate spatial elements, please see Point of Contact.

  • Redmap is a primarily a website that invites the community to spot, log and map marine species that are uncommon in their region, or along particular parts of their coast. The information collected is mapped and displayed on the site, demonstrating, in time, how species distributions may be changing. Sightings are divided into two categories – those with a photo that can be ‘verified’ by a marine biologist, and sightings without photos that we call community sightings (anecdotal). All the information collected, with and without photos, is mapped and will be used in the following years to map out a ‘story’ of changes occurring in our marine environment. The main data collected includes the species sighted (normally selected from a list comprising preselected species of interest), the location, date/time and activity being undertaken. Other optional information gathered include biological data such as sex, size and weight and environmental data such as water depth and temperature and habitat. This record is associated with live data (and will subsequently change over time) and spatial elements have reduced accuracy. It is also subject to a three year embargo (ie. does not contain data less than three years old). If you wish to discuss obtaining a citable, static dataset, that is current and/or contains accurate spatial elements, please email enquiries@redmap.org.au.

  • Redmap is a primarily a website that invites the community to spot, log and map marine species that are uncommon in their region, or along particular parts of their coast. The information collected is mapped and displayed on the site, demonstrating, in time, how species distributions may be changing. Sightings are divided into two categories – those with a photo that can be ‘verified’ by a marine biologist, and sightings without photos that we call community sightings (anecdotal). All the information collected, with and without photos, is mapped and will be used in the following years to map out a ‘story’ of changes occurring in our marine environment. The main data collected includes the species sighted (normally selected from a list comprising preselected species of interest), the location, date/time and activity being undertaken. Other optional information gathered include biological data such as sex, size and weight and environmental data such as water depth and temperature and habitat. This record is associated with live data (and will subsequently change over time) and spatial elements have reduced accuracy. It is also subject to a three year embargo (ie. does not contain data less than three years old). If you wish to discuss obtaining a citable, static dataset, that is current and/or contains accurate spatial elements, please see Point of Contact.

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    Two OneTemp HOBO pressure data loggers were installed at the Seaport Marina in central Launceston in June 2014 by Dr Ian Kidd, measuring water depth at 1-hr intervals as well as water temperature. Depth is calculated from temperature, total pressure, and barometric pressure, based on fresh water density. The height of the gauge relative to AHD was measured 23 March 2018 by Launceston City Council surveyor Leigh Cornwell, and a correction applied to the data to give water level in metres AHD. The gauge was installed for the purpose of Dr Kidd's PhD research into sediment transport processes in the upper Tamar, and remains open with data collected monthly by Karen Palmer (IMAS honours student). Both projects were supervised by Dr Andrew Fischer.

  • Redmap is a primarily a website that invites the community to spot, log and map marine species that are uncommon in their region, or along particular parts of their coast. The information collected is mapped and displayed on the site, demonstrating, in time, how species distributions may be changing. Sightings are divided into two categories – those with a photo that can be ‘verified’ by a marine biologist, and sightings without photos that we call community sightings (anecdotal). All the information collected, with and without photos, is mapped and will be used in the following years to map out a ‘story’ of changes occurring in our marine environment. The main data collected includes the species sighted (normally selected from a list comprising preselected species of interest), the location, date/time and activity being undertaken. Other optional information gathered include biological data such as sex, size and weight and environmental data such as water depth and temperature and habitat. This record is associated with live data (and will subsequently change over time) and spatial elements have reduced accuracy. It is also subject to a three year embargo (ie. does not contain data less than three years old). If you wish to discuss obtaining a citable, static dataset, that is current and/or contains accurate spatial elements, please see Point of Contact.