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2020

62 record(s)
 
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  • We performed a 5-week experiment in controlled laboratory settings to investigate the effects of different types of microparticles (i.e., PVC/red clay) on the performance of the Mediterranean mussel. Several response variables including respiration rate, byssus production, body condition index and survival were collected. Our study's main purpose is to examine effects of synthetic microparticles on bivalves using a more relevant methodological approach, i.e., in comparison to naturally-occurring particles, since these filter-feeders are exposed to not just microplastics in the real-world environment, but also to various naturally suspended seston particles, such as detritus and sediments.

  • Data for the project -Investigating the source of the high nitrate, low oxygen layer in the Leeuwin Current- is including in the file. The data include CTD data, ADCP data and Triaxus data from RV Investigator (Voyage IN2019_V03). Also the Sea Surface Height satellite data and CSIRO Atlas of Regional Seas (CARS) data are included as the supporting data. The MATLAB code including the code that calculate the rotated velocity and the transport of the EGC current in upper 300m including volume transport, salinity transport, heat transport and oxygen transport. The nitrate data from Triaxus is uncompleted and will be upload later with the code for calculating the nitrate transport.

  • Baited remote underwater stereo-video (stereo-BRUV) were used to sample the fish assemblages of the Hunter Marine Park and adjacent Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park at equivalent depths. Stereo-BRUV were deployed in both autumn and spring from spring 2016 to autumn 2018 and at depth of 32-105m. The videos were analyse to all fish species to the lowest taxonmic level and estimate relative abundance (MaxN) and lengths of all species. This information was used to form a baseline of the benthic fish assemblages of the Hunter Marine Park. This study was done as part of the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub D3 project (https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/project/project-d3-implementing-monitoring-amps-and-status-marine-biodiversity-assets-continental).

  • This project will determine the downburst thunderstorms over Tasmania from the Severe Storms Archive, investigate the atmospheric condition during those downburst thunderstorms and determine the probability of meteorological conditions suitable for downburst thunderstorms over Tasmania during 1990-2019. This project will use the recently completed Bureau of Meteorology Atmospheric high-resolution Regional Reanalysis for Australia (BARRA) dataset, which offers more than 100 atmospheric model variables at higher resolution in space and time than existing global reanalyses (Jakob et al. 2017). The hourly temporal resolution, 70 levels vertical resolution and 1.5 km horizontal resolution, which has been developed specifically for Tasmania and other three regions, makes it particularly powerful in comparison to larger scale reanalyses for analysis of short-term phenomena like thunderstorms and their environments in Tasmania.

  • Data describing post-recruit (adult) fish assemblages and the abundance of recruiting cryptobenthic species associated with 28 artificial reefs of different sizes and supporting different densities of transplanted kelp (Ecklonia radiata) off the west coast of Maria island. Adult assemblages were assessed using diver-based visual surveys conducted at three times (early: spring 2015, middle: autumn: 2016, late: spring 2016). At each time, 2 surveys were conducted, and the results were averaged. Recruiting cryptobenthic fishes were assessed using SMURF (standard Monitoring Units for the Recruitment of Fishes) collectors that were deployed for a six-week period in the centre of each reef on four consecutive occasions (November 2015 to March 2016).

  • Trace element (TE) concentrations of juvenile Short-tailed Shearwaters collected on Great Dog Island, Tasmanian in 2017.

  • In situ time-lapse photography was used to characterise movement and feeding preferences of the Pacific crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris) in the northern and southern Great Barrier Reef in 2015. This record describes the data accompanying the publication (in press): Homing behaviour by destructive crown-of-thorns starfish is triggered by local availability of coral prey. Data files are: 1) CoTS movement and behavioural observations 2) CoTS individual movement tracks (per image) from time-lapse photography 3) feeding electivity on coral species by CoTS from time-lapse photography

  • Voyage IN2019_V04 contributed an additional 29,000 kms2 of seafloor survey data to the Coral Sea knowledge base. From this new bathymetric data individual seamounts have been extracted and have been classified to the Geoscience Australia Geomorphology Classification Scheme. This dataset contains two layers representing the classification layers- 1) Surface (Plain, Slope, Escarpment) and 2) fine scale Geomorphology of the seamount for the Fregetta Seamount. Ongoing research with this survey data will provide new insights into the detailed geomorphic shape and spatial relationships between adjacent seabed features. This information will be released in future publications to show the potential of how the scale of such seafloor data can be used for predictive habitat modelling when analysed with the biological data overlays.

  • Nitrogen stable isotope data from soil, leaf and spider samples collected from invaded, never invaded and eradicated islands around New Zealand's north island; and associated R code used to investigate the use of stable isotope analysis as a post-eradication ecosystem function assessment tool.

  • Antarctic Landfast sea ice (fast ice) is important climatologically, biologically and for logistics for short time-scale anomalies. Until recently, there hasn’t been an accurate, high-resolution fast ice extent dataset which can support an analysis on drivers of fast ice and most studies only investigate fast ice on limited regions of Antarctica in a limited time scale. There is a need to extend the spatial and temporal studying coverage to provide detailed information on the Antarctic coast over a longer period. This is the first detailed analysis to identify and quantify correlation between the environmental anomaly and fast ice anomaly mainly in the east Antarctic coast. By examining regional/local fast ice extent in in east Antarctic coast in the context of the broader and/or remote-teleconnected atmospheric circulation/properties using spatial correlation techniques, a strong correlation between NINO3 region and Lützow-Holm Bay fast ice and similar and significant correlation of regional scale factors from Lützow-Holm Bay to Mawson Coast mainly are found. The results of this thesis suggest that the pack ice, atmospheric factors and oceanic factors are important for interpreting fast ice anomalies. To identify and quantify correlation between the pack ice, temperature at 2m, wind at 10m, snow fall anomaly, sea surface temperature anomaly, ocean heat content anomaly and fast ice anomaly, backward multiple linear regression is conducted to demonstrate some predictive fast ice driver information by quantifying the correlation between different drivers and fast ice anomaly. The multiple linear regression also suggests that oceanic influences including pack ice are generally more important than atmospheric influences. Future experiments could be conducted to interpret fast ice anomalies in the context of the ocean mainly.