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  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project D2 - "Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for survey design, condition assessment and trend detection". There are no data outputs anticipated for this project. -------------------- Understanding of the status and trends of indicators in Australia’s marine environment requires standardised monitoring, without which monitoring is unlikely to be comparable through time and space – status and trends are unlikely to be available. This project will build on the monitoring blueprint by providing foundation for Standard Operating Procedures in the collection and analysis of monitoring data. In particular, the project will 1) provide some delineation of what kind of monitoring is required (and when), 2) providing a simple tool for designing surveys in space that also analyses the resulting data, and 3) provide a worked end-to-end SOP example for a baited underwater video for collection of data in benthic key ecological features (including recommendations for field protocols to ensure ecological relevance). Planned Outputs • Standard Operating Protocol (SOPs) for deploying observation platforms, processing raw data and then analysing processed data for a set of ‘no regrets’ objectives. This includes clear recommendations about how to choose sampling locations and how to analyse the resulting survey data. • A piece of software (an R package) that implements spatially balanced designs. The software will require a minimal skill level. • A worked example, from a partner project, that will form the template for future surveys. • Scientific publications, which will be made publicly and freely available within 12 months of publication.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project D8 - "Canyon mapping & biodiversity in Gascoyne Marine Park". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Very little is known about the deep waters of Australia’s marine parks. Recent NESP-supported surveys have targeted eastern abyssal depths and Tasmanian seamounts (NESP Project D4), but there have been no similar efforts in Western Australia. To counter this information deficit, we plan to actively map and sample two significant and biologically unexplored submarine canyons (Cape Range and Cloates Canyon) in the habitat protection and multiple use zones of the Gascoyne Marine Park. Standard operating procedures for marine sampling (multibeam, survey design) will be followed, with other sampling platforms (e-DNA, ROV) informing future SOPs (NESP Project D2). Planned Outputs • ROV image library (to be archived with the Australian Marine Imagery Collection at NCI) • Derived bathymetric products (to be made available through Geoscience Australia website and linked to relevant portals, including the Marine Park Atlas and North-West Atlas) • Taxonomic identifications and associated metadata (to be made available online through Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) web portal) • Sanger genetic sequences and e-DNA sequences (to be lodged in databases such as NCBI’s Genbank, short read archive or DataDryad) • Multibeam data will be processed into bathymetric grids at Geoscience Australia and made available via the AusSeabed portal

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project A14 - "Identification of near-shore habitats of juvenile white sharks in Southwestern Australia". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- In early 2018, the CSIRO provided the first estimate of abundance for the southern-western adult white shark. Establishing an estimate of total abundance was not possible due to the lack of information of the juvenile life history stage in south-western Australia. The estimate of adult abundance also included trend (essentially zero or slightly negative), however, it was noted that to confirm the trend, a further decade of sampling would be required. This can be reduced if we identify near-shore habitats where juvenile white sharks from the southern-western population can be readily accessed. This pilot project will investigate credible anecdotal evidence of juvenile white sharks using near-shore habitat near the head of the Great Australia Bight, and inform future project development steps. The pilot project will include collaboration and the opportunity for capacity building with the Yatala Land Management group. The outcome of this pilot project will inform whether or not to proceed to future (on-water) activities. Planned Outputs • Spatial maps showing juvenile white-shark aggregation areas that include Australian marine park boundaries and zoning in jpeg format • Shapefile of juvenile white-shark aggregation areas provided to ERIN • High quality and project relevant images (still and video) suitable for communications purposes • Summary (and images) of opportunistic wildlife observations within the Great Australian Bight Marine Park (Commonwealth waters) • Final report

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project A6 - "Prioritisation of research and management needs for Australian elasmobranch species". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- NERP successfully demonstrated new ways to get the raw ingredients for evidence-based management of previously intractable species: abundance, survival, connectivity. But there is still a need to explore/demonstrate how management can use these tools (e.g. adaptive control of bycatch, or deciding if more monitoring is needed), and which species are suitable. This project comprises (i) a workshop to re-assess Australian shark and ray species in terms of degree-of-concern, state-of-knowledge-for-management, and feasibility-of-filling-knowledge-gaps; and (ii) a desk study exemplifying one pathway to management use. In 2016, we will work with DoE to prioritize species for research and explore more management pathways. Planned Outputs • A report outlining workshop findings, recommendations relative to data gaps and effective research approaches to address these gaps. • A paper demonstrating how management can use new methods to examine adaptive monitoring of bycatch to assess impact • Presentation of results to key stakeholders and end users

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    This record describes data collected for the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water". This project record provides linkage to each of metadata records describing seagrass data collected from the 11 study areas: Beaufort Inlet (2009), Hardy Inlet (2008), Irwin Inlet (2009), Leschenault Estuary (2009), Oyster Harbour (1988, 1996, 2006), Princess Royal Harbour (1996, 2006) Stokes Inlet (2009), Swan Canning (2011), Walpole Nornalup Inlets (2009), Wellstead Estuary (2009), Wilson Inlet (2007, 2008). To access the source datasets from each study site/sampling occasion in their original (unaggregated) form, see child records linked to this parent record.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project A7 - "Monitoring population dynamics of ‘Western’ Right Whales off Southern Australia". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Continuation (since 1993) of annual aerial surveys, to include counts and identification photographs, of Southern Right Whales between Cape Leeuwin (WA) and Ceduna (SA), where wintering animals come close to the coast – adult females to calve, at approximately three-year intervals, other adults and juveniles less regularly. The area is the main wintering ground of a major ‘western’ subpopulation of ‘Australian’ right whales, differing in number and extent of recovery (from 19th century hunting) from an ‘eastern’ subpopulation which so far shows little if any recovery. Counts allow estimation of population trend and current numbers; identification photographs allow estimation of life history parameters. This project serves to implement a very high priority action in the Australian Government’s Conservation Management Plan for Southern Right Whale (2011-21) – Action Area B1: Measuring and monitoring population recovery; continue to obtain and refine population abundance and trends for the south-west population. Planned Outputs • Counts of animals (by class – cows accompanied by calves, other animals, by position (GPS) and time. • Head and (where appropriate) body photographs, by position and time. • Information on Biologically Important Areas for Southern Right Whales in the area surveyed. • ‘Progress’ and ‘Final’ reports, annually • Report annually to the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission. • Public information through press releases and on the Museum website.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project D4 - "Expanding our spatial knowledge of marine biodiversity to support future best-practice reviews". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- This project will fill data gaps and evaluate methods relevant to the ongoing spatial management of seafloor biota across the Australian marine domain. The objective is to prepare Australian, State and Territory governments for future best-practice reviews of Australia’s marine bioregionalisation that can be used to improve marine spatial planning and management initiatives (e.g. marine bioregional plan and marine protected area reviews, environmental impact and natural heritage assessments). The project will incorporate results from field trips to unexplored offshore areas of Australia’s marine domain and communicate biodiversity values of the AMP network to the Australian public. Planned Outputs • Report evaluating the usefulness of phylodiversity (genetic diversity) to spatial marine planning • Report outlining extensions of known statistical approaches to be able to utilise available mixed-resolution biological data (including museum and historical data) for the production of best-evidence bioregional maps • Report evaluating the usefulness of connectivity (current) models to spatial marine planning • Report including description and images of deep-sea biological communities of the east coast, including the CMR network, on a scheduled November 2016 expedition of the NMF ‘Investigator’ (mid 2016-7). This survey will result in significant media opportunities to promote the values of the CMR network. • Report including description and images of banks, seamounts and pelagic aggregations within the Cocos Keeling/Christmas Island territories. This would require a successful application for ship-time on the NMF ‘Investigator’ • Report investigating the possibility of downscaling biogeographic maps to the typical scale of areas of conservation concern (1-100 km) by utilising emerging fine-scale bathymetry (provided by the shelf mapping project), acoustic and water movement data

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub project E6 - "Assisting restoration of ecosystem engineers through seed-based and shoot-based programs in the Shark Bay WHS". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- This project is a collaboration between scientists and the Shark Bay Malgana Indigenous community into jointly developed seeding and shoot planting methods to assist natural recovery of seagrasses in preparation for future devastating impacts of climate change. The Shark Bay World Heritage Site (WHS) is unique globally for its natural values, including stromatolites, seagrass meadows and marine megafauna including dugongs, sharks, turtles, and dolphins. The immediate goal is to scale up the existing restoration research to assist recovery of the dominant seagrasses, Amphibolis antarctica and Posidonia australis following the 2011 marine heat wave. Planned Outputs • A seagrass restoration toolkit (multimedia and report format) - will include information on sourcing suitable genetic material • Data on the trial seed restoration outcomes

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project D3 - "Implementing monitoring of AMPs and the status of marine biodiversity assets on the continental shelf". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- There is a significant need to support Parks Australia in the establishment of an inventory and monitoring program for Australian Marine Park (AMP) networks, and ensure it is integrated within broader national monitoring frameworks. The first part of this project provided a national collation all known mapping data from government and industry (including data acquired during CERF and NERP Hubs) to improve understanding of the distribution and extent of this key habitat around Australia, and to identify critical gaps in this knowledge to be filled by targeted surveys. This significantly improved understanding of KEF boundaries and conservation values or assets within Commonwealth Marine Reserves on Australia’s continental shelf. A classification system was developed for these reefs, and matched with refinement of inventory and monitoring approaches to track reef health through time, including standard approaches to SOE understanding and reporting consistent with measures developed for coastal systems within NESP (i.e. see project C2). This also involved collation of all mapping data on non-reef hard substrate, and all non-reef soft substrate, with this information also being available as a significant output. The second part of this project initiates a series of surveys, utilising standard operating procedures (SOPs), to demonstrate a sustainable path for a national survey program. By facilitating national approaches, including a standards-based approach to collecting new marine data, project outcomes will include key steps to assist Parks Australia to implement and initiate an AMP monitoring program, new knowledge to inform AMP management, a national integrated framework for State of Environment (SOE) reporting, and collaboration between State-based and Commonwealth-based programs. Planned Outputs • National-scale map of the distribution and extent of reef/non-reef habitat on the Aus continental shelf • Collation of all available mapping data for the Aus continental shelf • Detailed reports specific to each AMP survey, including a plain English summary • Survey data stored in national databases and portals • New multibeam mapping data from AMP survey areas and adjacent waters • New data on benthic invertebrate cover obtained from AUV imagery surveys • New data on benthic fish abundance obtained by BRUV surveys

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project B4 - "Underpinning the repair and conservation of Australia’s threatened coastal-marine habitats". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- The primary objective of this project is to provide essential research to underpin restoration efforts to increase the success and efficiency of shellfish and saltmarsh repair. The secondary objective is to quantify clear easily understood benefits of repair to further increase groundswell, Indigenous and interest group support for repair efforts. For Phase 2 this involves: Shellfish reefs 1. Providing critical research to underpin the success of companion works investments into Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) restoration in Qld and NSW 2. Ongoing engagement with Indigenous groups, focused around especially SEQ and NSW to match the emphasis on Sydney rock oyster; 3. Through the Nature Conservancy, linking to shellfish restoration works in Port Phillip Bay (Vic), St Vincent’s Gulf (SA) and Oyster Harbour (WA) so that a National Business Case complete with examples of successes to date can be developed; 4. Underpinning this succinct business case with an information base for any follow-on activities such as assessment of shellfish reefs as an endangered community. Salt marshes 1. Estimating the benefits of salt marsh repair for an easily publicly understood indicator - prawn species. 2. Undertaking this work in NSW and Qld in parallel with proposed repair works so that very concrete case studies are available to demonstrate the benefits of repair. Planned Outputs Shellfish reef project outputs: • A scientific paper published in an eminent, peer-reviewed journal describing the ecology and biodiversity of shellfish reefs and biodiversity comparison against other marine habitats; • A scientific paper published in an eminent, peer-reviewed journal which identifies trajectories of change from past baselines to current condition and develops achievable targets for repair; • News stories, web articles, social media, brochures and oral presentations at national/international conferences, which communicate the key research findings to coastal stakeholders such as fishers, divers, NRM groups and government agencies; • News stories, web articles and social media which communicate the importance of shellfish reefs and shellfish food sources to Indigenous Australians; • Summary of community benefit and business propositions for coastal wetland repair expanding on the vision of a rejuvenated coastal ecology and written at the level required for input to various investors, agencies and public policy; • Updates at the end of 2016 as part of stakeholder engagement and continued communication. Salt marsh prawn productivity outputs: • A scientific paper published in an eminent, peer-reviewed journal quantifying and contrasting prawn productivity in healthy and degraded salt marsh communities in tropical and temperate environments; • Publicly accessible communication resources (brochures, social media, media releases and webpages) which articulate simply the prawn productivity values of salt marshes and links this to the need for the protection, conservation and restoration of degraded salt marsh communities.