Creation year

2018

37 record(s)
 
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    Understanding the patterns and characteristics of sedimentary deposits on the conjugate Australian-Antarctic margins is critical to reveal the Cretaceous-Cenozoic tectonic, oceanographic and climatic conditions in the basin. However, unravelling its evolution has remained difficult due to the different seismic stratigraphic interpretations on each margin and sparse drill sites. Here, for the first time, we collate all available seismic reflection profiles on both margins and use newly available offshore drilling data, to develop a consistent seismic stratigraphic framework across the Australian-Antarctic basins. We find sedimentation patterns similar in structure and thickness, prior to the onset of Antarctic glaciation, enabling the basin-wide correlation of four major sedimentary units and their depositional history. We interpret that during the warm and humid Late Cretaceous (~83-65 Ma), large onshore river systems on both Australia and Antarctica resulted in deltaic sediment deposition offshore. We interpret that the onset of clockwise bottom currents during the Early Paleogene (~58-48 Ma) formed prominent sediment drift deposits along both continental rises. We suggest that these currents strengthened and progressed farther east through the Eocene. Coevally, global cooling (<48 Ma) and progressive aridification led to a large-scale decrease in sediment input from both continents. Two major Eocene hiatuses recovered by the IODP site U1356A at the Antarctic continental slope likely formed during this pre-glacial phase of low sedimentation and strong bottom currents. Our results can be used to constrain future paleo-oceanographic modelling of this region and aid understanding of the oceanographic changes accompanying the transition from a greenhouse to icehouse world.

  • Short-tailed shearwater stable isotope data, nitrogen and carbon. This data was collected to document dietary trends.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research data outputs of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project E4 - "Recreational fishing in Commonwealth waters". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Recent assessment have suggested that Australian marine recreational fishers (MRF) are moving further offshore in pursuit of fishing opportunities, which places them in areas managed by the Australian Government. As recreational fishers are key stakeholders in marine management, of MRF effort, catch, motivations and values are required to effectively inform administration of Australian Marine Parks (AMPs) and fisheries. In 2018 the use of exiting MRF state-wide assessment was trialled in WA and NSW to quantify fishing within the Hunter and Ningaloo AMPs. In 2019 this work will be extended to analyse state charter-boat MRF datasets with a particular emphasis on our selected AMPs and the Perth Canyon AMP. Planned Outputs • State of knowledge and gap analysis of recreational fishing in Commonwealth waters (spatial data) • On ground motivation and targets by active fishers of AMP [report]

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research data outputs of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project E2 - "Characterising anthropogenic underwater noise to improve understanding and management of acoustic impacts to marine wildlife". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Shipping noise is a marine pollutant that contributes significantly to the marine soundscape and is a stressor of marine animals, particularly marine mammals. In Australia, the characterisation and actual impacts of shipping noise on species behaviour are not clearly understood and information is needed. This research will provide quantitative spatial and temporal maps of shipping noise to inform on noise exposure and impacts to MNES within the EEZ and in WHA’s. The outputs will provide key information to marine management agencies such as DoEE, AMSA and GBRMPA to help them meet responsibilities and obligations under international and national law and policy to minimise the impacts of shipping noise on MNES. Planned Outputs • A suite of maps of chronic shipping noise for key areas and species of concern, identifying key management areas and gross polluters. • A database of ship source spectra for predominant large vessels • A paper on improved methods or ambient noise estimation • Report on the quantification of shipping noise on Matters of National Environmental Significance • Final report on the characterisation of shipping noise in Australia

  • These data were collected on Southern Surveyor transit voyage SS2013_T01 from Sydney to Hobart in February 2013. The voyage was a teaching voyage as part of KSA724. Masters students participated in the collection of standard oceanographic data, focusing on eddies of the East Australian Current. This dataset includes for reference the nutrient and hydrography bottle data as produced by the Marine National Facility, as well as the fluorometrically determined extracted chlorophyll concentration

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    Water samples collected on the RV Investigator Transit voyage IN2018_T01 were analysed for concentration of chlorophyll a.

  • ***NOTE THIS RECORD HAS BEEN SUPERSEDED BY NESP PROJECT E2 (details below)*** Cumulative Sound Exposure Levels of shipping traffic in Australian waters was undertaken over a one year period (Sept. 2015 to Oct 2016) within the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone. A proof of concept cumulative ship noise map was developed around Australia using the Perth Canyon source spectra as the source level for different vessel type categories. Sound propagation models were then run cumulatively, integrating the time spent by ships within a grid cell over the one-year period. This record describes the proof of concept map of commercial shipping noise in Australian waters developed under NESP Project C5. Refer to final report (https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/document/quantification-risk-shipping-large-marine-fauna-across-australia-final-report) for full methodology and PDF map. The ship noise modelling demonstrated the potential for using simple and readily accessible transmission models to provide an accurate representation of shipping noise within the marine soundscape. A subsequent high resolution sound exposure map was generated under NESP Project E2. See https://catalogue.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/en/metadata.show?uuid=480847b4-b692-4112-89ff-0dcef75e3b84

  • Water level heights were measured every 5 minutes at five station locations in the 70km length Tamar estuary, Tasmania, for six months. Pressure loggers deployed in the water recorded total pressure and the inverse barometer effect was accounted for by two additional pressure loggers deployed above ground within 15km of a station. The data include barometric pressure, water temperature, and water level relative to Australian Height Datum (AHD83). The data captures tidal amplification and asymmetry between ebb and flood tides in the estuary for the purpose of a research project completed in 2018 by Karen Palmer. Based on the Tamar estuary model created for NRM North by BMT WBM Pty Ltd using TUFLOW FV (with permission), a new hydrodynamic model was created and calibrated with observed water levels. Different scenarios of sea level rise and bathymetry change were then simulated to model the effects on tidal amplitude and phase.

  • Relevant spatial datasets for mapping pressures were identified and collated. Pressures were categorised as resource extraction and use, pollution, habitat modification, climate, and ‘other’. Pressures included Commonwealth trawl fisheries effort, aquaculture infrastructure, location of oil and gas infrastructure, historical shipping and pollution data, location of historical seismic operations, cyclone intensity, spoil dumping, sewage outfalls, location of ports, and tourism operations. Two main pressure maps were derived i) an additive pressure hotspots map, which gives higher weight to areas with multiple pressures of high risk; and, ii) a multiplicative hotspot pressure map, which gives lower weighting to areas with multiple low risk pressures. Areas of high risk were identified, and thus possibly high benefit for management versus low risk or low associated benefit for mitigation. The information generated needs to be considered alongside robust species distribution data and interaction matrices for effective decision-making.

  • NOTE THIS IS AN ARCHIVED VERSION OF THE GLOBAL FISHERIES LANDING DATA. The current version of the data is available from https://metadata.imas.utas.edu.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/5c4590d3-a45a-4d37-bf8b-ecd145cb356d and should be used for all future analyses from 16/01/2019. For any questions about version changes to this dataset, please contact the Point of Contact nominated in this record. Global fisheries landings supplied by a number of agencies (FAO/UN, CCAMLR, NAFO, ICES etc) are mapped to 30-min spatial cells based on the range/gradient of the reported taxon, the spatial access of the reporting country's fleets, and the original reporting area. This data is separated to industrial and non-industrial fishing and associated with types of fishing gears. Estimates of illegal, unreported and unallocated landings are included as are estimates of the weight of fisheries products discarded at sea. For appropriate records, spatial information from tuna regional management organisations and satellite-based vessel Automatic Identification System (AIS) were used to allow greater precision. Mapping the source of fisheries capture allows investigation of the impacts of fishing and the vulnerability of fishing (with its associate food security implications) to climate change impacts.