Creation year

2018

37 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
From 1 - 10 / 37
  • Meta data of all tagged hammerhead sharks detailing tag dates, locations, and shark biological details.

  • ***NOTE THIS RECORD HAS BEEN SUPERSEDED BY NESP PROJECT E2 (details below)*** Cumulative Sound Exposure Levels of shipping traffic in Australian waters was undertaken over a one year period (Sept. 2015 to Oct 2016) within the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone. A proof of concept cumulative ship noise map was developed around Australia using the Perth Canyon source spectra as the source level for different vessel type categories. Sound propagation models were then run cumulatively, integrating the time spent by ships within a grid cell over the one-year period. This record describes the proof of concept map of commercial shipping noise in Australian waters developed under NESP Project C5. Refer to final report (https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/document/quantification-risk-shipping-large-marine-fauna-across-australia-final-report) for full methodology and PDF map. The ship noise modelling demonstrated the potential for using simple and readily accessible transmission models to provide an accurate representation of shipping noise within the marine soundscape. A subsequent high resolution sound exposure map was generated under NESP Project E2. See https://catalogue.aodn.org.au/geonetwork/srv/en/metadata.show?uuid=480847b4-b692-4112-89ff-0dcef75e3b84

  • Categories    

    The Huon Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) covers a broad depth range from the inner continental shelf at about 70 m, to abyssal depths of more than 3000 m. The majority of the area is in deep water. The Tasman Seamounts Marine Reserve that was proclaimed in 1999 has been wholly incorporated into the Huon Commonwealth marine reserve. The reserve contains a cluster of seamounts that appear as cone-shaped submerged mountains, which provide a range of depths for a diversity of plants and animals. The peaks of many of the reserve's seamounts are between 750 m and 1000 m below the sea surface and support endemic species, including large erect corals and sponges. Some of the flora and fauna are hundreds and possibly thousands of years old, making them some of the longest-lived animals on Earth. The reserve also provides an important connection between seamounts of the Indian Ocean and the Tasman Sea. This map of the geomorphology of the Huon CMR was prepared for the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Theme D (1) project: National data collation, synthesis and visualisation to support sustainable use, management and monitoring of marine assets.

  • Seven case study locations (Keep, Daly, Roper, McArthur, Flinders, and Gilbert River estuaries, and Darwin Harbour) were used to test the utility of the Australian Landsat data archive in the Digital Earth Australia analysis platform for characterising and monitoring the condition and change in coastal habitats. A suite of analyses was undertaken including: assessing the extent of different coastal habitats, detecting coastal change including change in mangrove communities, and the distribution of intertidal areas. The work was successful in: (a) generating baseline information for the case study areas; and, (b) developing valuable monitoring tools for future use.

  • Short-tailed shearwater stable isotope data, nitrogen and carbon. This data was collected to document dietary trends.

  • Categories    

    Water samples collected on the RV Investigator Transit voyage IN2018_T01 were analysed for concentration of chlorophyll a.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research data outputs of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project E2 - "Characterising anthropogenic underwater noise to improve understanding and management of acoustic impacts to marine wildlife". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Shipping noise is a marine pollutant that contributes significantly to the marine soundscape and is a stressor of marine animals, particularly marine mammals. In Australia, the characterisation and actual impacts of shipping noise on species behaviour are not clearly understood and information is needed. This research will provide quantitative spatial and temporal maps of shipping noise to inform on noise exposure and impacts to MNES within the EEZ and in WHA’s. The outputs will provide key information to marine management agencies such as DoEE, AMSA and GBRMPA to help them meet responsibilities and obligations under international and national law and policy to minimise the impacts of shipping noise on MNES. Planned Outputs • A suite of maps of chronic shipping noise for key areas and species of concern, identifying key management areas and gross polluters. • A database of ship source spectra for predominant large vessels • A paper on improved methods or ambient noise estimation • Report on the quantification of shipping noise on Matters of National Environmental Significance • Final report on the characterisation of shipping noise in Australia

  • This record provides an overview of the scope of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project E1 - "Guidelines for analysis of cumulative impacts and risks to the Great Barrier Reef". No raw data products are anticipated for this project. -------------------- The project will develop guidance for the analysis of cumulative impacts and risks to the environmental, social and economic values of the GBR. The project will use existing information to develop guidance for use by GBRMPA, DoEE, the Queensland Government and proponents of future development proposals. The project will build on the work undertaken in the GBR Strategic Assessment and support works undertaken under the Reef 2050 plan. The guidance will provide a practical science-based approach to assessment of cumulative risks to the Reef. Research will focus on providing a general and repeatable approach to be applied at the whole-of-reef scale (to meet planning, assessment and reporting requirements of the GBRMPA) and also at the development-site-scale (to meet the environmental assessment requirements of the GBRMPA and future proponents). The guidance will be developed in close collaboration with the GBRMPA and DoEE to ensure it is practical and compatible with relevant legislation and policy applicable to proposed actions within the GBR. The project will include a case study focused on attributing impacts of pressures and their cumulative impacts on shallow-water coral reefs of eastern Australia (including cumulative impacts for the whole-of-GBR). It will also examine how this could be applied to shallow temperate reefs follow recent risk assessments conducted in NSW. Research is primarily designed to meet the specific needs of GBRMPA and future proponents. NSW DPI, QLD Government and Parks Australia, may also benefit from the case study and insights to assessment of cumulative impacts. Planned Outputs • Case Study Report on GBR & Coral Sea reefs pressure analysis. • Final report - guidance for analysis of cumulative impacts and risk

  • Australia has established a network of 58 marine parks within Commonwealth waters covering a total of 3.3 million square kilometres, or 40 per cent of our exclusive economic zone (excluding Australian Antarctic Territory). These parks span a range of settings, from near coastal and shelf habitats to abyssal plains. Parks Australia manages the park network through management plans that came into effect for all parks on 1 July 2018. Geoscience Australia is contributing to their management by collating and interpreting existing environmental data, and through the collection of new data. This includes compiling existing bathymetry datasets for select marine parks. This dataset includes a compilation of multibeam sonar bathymetry (gridded to 100 m spatial resolution) for Bremer Marine Park, in the South-west Marine Park Network. The park incorporates Bremer Canyon and adjacent smaller canyons that incise the continental slope and outer shelf. This research is supported by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub through Project D1.

  • Comprehensive baseline environmental data for Storm Bay in south eastern Tasmania were required to inform the salmonid industry regarding site selection, to provide background environmental data before large-scale farming commences, and to support the development of a scientifically relevant and cost-effective environmental monitoring program. Storm Bay is a large deep bay that receives freshwater inflow from the River Derwent on its north-western boundary and exchanges water with Frederick Henry Bay on its north-eastern boundary. The eastern and western boundaries are defined by the Tasman Peninsula and Bruny Island, respectively, and the southern boundary connects with the Tasman Sea. This area is a mixing zone between the River Derwent outflow and oceanic waters. The oceanography in Storm Bay is complex and is characterized by considerable fluctuations in temperature, salinity and nutrients on variable temporal and spatial scales. This is due to the southerly extension of warm nutrient-depleted sub-tropical waters transported via the East Australian Current (EAC) down the east coast of Tasmania over summer, whilst the south and south-west coasts are influenced by cooler, nutrient-rich sub-Antarctic waters from the south and the Leeuwin Current from the north-west (Buchanan et al. 2014). The current project arose in response to the salmon aquaculture industry recognising the need for increased scientific knowledge to support ecologically sustainable development of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farming operations in south-eastern Tasmania, particularly expansion into Storm Bay. The information provided will assist salmon companies to manage their operations in Storm Bay under varying environmental conditions. Our research has also provided the opportunity to investigate changes in water quality over a quarter of a century, as CSIRO investigated seasonal and inter-annual variability in chemical and biological parameters in Storm Bay during 1985-89. We sampled at the same “master station” in Storm Bay as CSIRO and used similar procedures where possible. Five sites were sampled monthly in Storm Bay for over five years from November 2009 to April 2015, except on rare occasions when weather conditions were unsuitable, and bimonthly at times in 2013 when external funding was not available. Site 1 was located at the mouth of the Derwent estuary and the entrance to Storm Bay, site 2 was in the same location as the ‘master site’ of a CSIRO study in 1985-88, site 3 was furthest offshore and provided the most information on oceanic currents influencing the bay, while sites 5 and 6 were requested by the salmon aquaculture industry as potential sites for expansion of salmon farming. Site 4 was further offshore and monitoring at this site was discontinued after three months because of insufficient time to collect samples from all sites in one day. An additional site, 9, at the entrance to Frederick Henry Bay was included from 18 July 2011 at the request of the Marine Farming Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), to provide information on water quality coming from Frederick Henry Bay. Adjacent to, and largely unaffected by the River Derwent, Frederick Henry Bay is a large marine embayment with limited freshwater input from the Coal River at its northern boundary. ---------------------------------------------- See child records linked to this parent record for specific context and methodologies for each of the monitoring variables (phytoplankton, zooplankton, chlorophyll, pigment, nutrients, oceanography).