Creation year

2008

32 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
From 1 - 10 / 32
  • In the Derwent Estuary (south eastern Tasmania, Australia), the introduced northern Pacific seastar Asterias amurensis is highly abundant and fecund when associated with anthropogenic structures (wharves and marinas). Based on modelled predictions of fertilisation success, seastars at wharf 'hotspots', whilst representing <10% of the total population in the Derwent Estuary, and concentrated in <0.1% of the total area, contribute up to >80% of total larval production in the estuary. Reproductive potential of populations at wharf and control sites was quantified (in terms of individual capacity and spatial characteristics of the population. A large scale survey was undertaken in the Derwent estuary (to 27m) to determine spatial distribution of the species. Zygote production (i.e. number of fertilised eggs) was used as a measure of reproductive output and was simulated using empirical estimates of spatial and reproductive parameters of the adult seastars in a spatially explicit model of fertilization (developed by A. Morris and C. Johnson).

  • The spatial extent of the long spined sea urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, was estimated by divers using underwater visual census methods to survey rocky reef habitats at 13 regions along Tasmania's east coast (between Eddystone Point and Recherche Bay). Within each region 3 subsites were surveyed, and within each subsite 4 belt transects were surveyed. Divers recorded depth, percent substrata type, percent C. rodgersii barrens habitat; abundance of urchins (C. rodgersii and H. erythrogramma), rock lobster (J. edwardsii) and abalone (H. rubra). Divers also recorded algal cover (estimated), C. rodgersii barrens and substratum type using set categories (see below).

  • Sea urchin tagged using tetracycline display visible marks in jaw elements and test plates that can be used to determine growth and subsequently an individuals age. Natural growth lines in the same structures can be used to determine age if natural lines are deposited at a consistent rates independent of age. Sea urchins were tagged using tetracycline and age determined from both fitted growth models and the number of bands deposited. Rates of natural line deposition were also quantified.

  • Interactions between native and introduced species can help to elucidate the impact of exotic species on the broader community. This work examines utilisation of an introduced gastropod, the New Zealand screwshell (Maoricolpus roseus) by native hermit crabs in eastern Tasmania.

  • Interactions between native and introduced species can help to elucidate the impact of exotic species on the broader community. This work examines utilisation of an introduced gastropod, the New Zealand screwshell (Maoricolpus roseus) by native hermit crabs in eastern Tasmania. Variation in shell occupancy by hermit crabs was examined across different depths (10, 20, 30 and 40m) within a single site (Dennes Point, SE Tasmania). Sediment cores were taken from 10 and 20 m to compare sediment size structure. A sediment preference trial using the hermit crab Paguristes tuberculatus was also carried out (using sediment from 10m and 20m) to try and determine the low level of hermit crab occupancy at 20m (compared with that at 10m).

  • Interactions between native and introduced species can help to elucidate the impact of exotic species on the broader community. This work examines utilisation of an introduced gastropod, the New Zealand screwshell (Maoricolpus roseus) by native hermit crabs in eastern Tasmania. Samples of screwshells were collected from Bass Strait, Maria Island, Pirates Bay and Dennes Point using a modified scallop dredge or collected by divers. Site location, date, depth, dredge opening size were recorded, and random sub-samples of shells were measured for length and width, and spire damage was scored. Hermit crabs, if present, were identified to species, sexed and measured.

  • Reef Life Survey is a program that trains and assists a network of skilled and committed recreational divers to cost-effectively assess the state of the inshore marine environment at the continental scale. The program uses standardised underwater visual census methods employed by SCUBA divers to survey fish and invertebrate species and to record macroalgal and coral cover using photo quadrats - this record refers to the website for this program. By standardising techniques and establishing a monitoring system on a nation-wide scale, the program addresses many of the current problems associated with managing the marine environment, including the paucity, patchiness and variable quality of data on the distribution of and trends to marine biodiversity. A central database is managed for the storage, analysis and dissemination of data collected nationally, with a publicly-accessible web-based portal. The website allows information collected on Australia's marine environment to be accessed in a meaningful form by policy-makers and the general public, including recreational groups, scientists and industry. It also has information and resources for particpating divers and those wishing to become involved. The dataset generated by recreational divers will provide a national framework for monitoring the state of the inshore environment and the identification of those threats and locations of greatest conservation concern. This record points to the online resource for Reef Life Survey: http://www.reeflifesurvey.com/

  • Sampling of commercial mid-water trawl catches for small pelagics from waters adjacent to Tasmania have yielded an extensive biological dataset in space and time. As a minimum, size composition information is available from most commerical shots undertaken between 2002 and 2006, referenced with operational information (location, depth and catch weight). Subsamples of the key small pelagics, redbait, jack mackerel and blue mackerel, were examined for size, sex, gonad weight and stage and otoliths have been retained for age determination. Further data has been collected since the initial investigation.

  • Underwater visual census surveys were conducted at 15 sites in eastern Tasmania to quantify the abundance of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma and several putative predators.

  • Categories    

    Reef Life Survey is designed to develop and resource a network of skilled recreational divers for rapid and cost-effective assessment of the state of the inshore marine environment at the global scale. The project uses standardised underwater visual census methods employed by trained SCUBA divers to survey fish and invertebrate species and to record habitat type using photo quadrats - this dataset refers to the cryptic fish and invertebrate survey component only.