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  • The data is quantitative abundance of fish and megafaunal invertebrates and algal % cover derived from transect based counts at a wide range of locations across Temperate Australia. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. Methods were initially developed for research on temporal changes following protection in Tasmanian MPAs (Maria Is, Tinderbox, Ninepin Point, Governor Island). The data represented by this record was collected in MPA studies and surveys interstate, and was collected from Jurien Bay (WA). In many cases the dataset involved temporal replication (year scale).

  • The data is quantitative abundance of fish and megafaunal invertebrates and algal % cover derived from transect based counts at a wide range of locations across Temperate Australia. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. Methods were initially developed for research on temporal changes following protection in Tasmanian MPAs (Maria Is, Tinderbox, Ninepin Point, Governor Island). The data represented by this record was collected in MPA studies and surveys interstate, and was collected from Batemans Bay (NSW). In many cases the dataset involved temporal replication (year scale).

  • The data is quantitative abundance of fish and megafaunal invertebrates and algal % cover derived from transect based counts at a wide range of locations across Temperate Australia. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. Methods were initially developed for research on temporal changes following protection in Tasmanian long-term MPAs (Maria Is, Tinderbox, Ninepin Point, Governor Island), and the data represented by this record has been collected at Tinderbox. In many cases the dataset involves temporal replication (year scale), particularly for the core Tasmanian MPAs represented by this record.

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    The main aim of this research program was to determine the potential for reducing the density of urchins to encourage the return of seaweeds and an improvement in urchin roe quality and quantity from remaining urchins. Tasmanian Sea Urchin Developments used two widely-separated sub-tidal experimental lease areas. One of these areas was at Meredith Point, on the east coast, and the other at Hope Island, on the south coast. Both sites had been subject to some overgrazing by urchins. At Meredith Point, the study area was divided into plots containing urchins at three densities: artificially enhanced, continually harvested and control (undisturbed). At Hope Island, controlled clearings of urchins and limpets from barrens areas were conducted. Recovery of vegetation was monitored as well as urchin roe quality and quantity. The data represented by this record was collected at Meredith Point.

  • The data is quantitative abundance of fish and megafaunal invertebrates and algal % cover derived from transect based counts at a wide range of locations across Temperate Australia. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. Methods were initially developed for research on temporal changes following protection in Tasmanian MPAs (Maria Is, Tinderbox, Ninepin Point, Governor Island). The data represented by this record was collected in MPA studies and surveys interstate, and was collected from the Port Lincoln district (SA). In many cases the dataset involved temporal replication (year scale).

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    The data is the percent algal cover derived from underwater visual census methods involving transect counts at rocky reef sites around Tasmania. This data forms part of a larger dataset that also surveyed fish and megafaunal invertebrate abundance for the area. The aggregated dataset allows examination of changes in Tasmanian shallow reef floral and faunal communities over a decadal scale - initial surveys were conducted in 1992-1995, and again at the same sites in 2006-2007. There are plans for ongoing surveys. An additional component was added in the latter study - a boat ramp study looking at the proximity of boat ramps and their effects of fishing. We analysed underwater visual census data on fishes and macroinvertebrates (abalone and rock lobsters) at 133 shallow rocky reef sites around Tasmania that ranged from 0.6 - 131 km from the nearest boat ramp. These sites were not all the same as those used for the comparison of 1994 and 2006 reef communities. The subset of 133 sites examined in this component consisted of only those sites that were characterized by the two major algal (kelp) types (laminarian or fucoid dominated). Sites with atypical algal assemblages were omitted from the 196 sites surveyed in 2006. This study aimed to examine reef community data for changes at the community level, changes in species richness and introduced species populations, and changes that may have resulted from ocean warming and fishing. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. The underwater visual census (UVC) methodology used to survey rocky reef communities was designed to maximise detection of (i) changes in population numbers and size-structure (ii) cascading ecosystem effects associated with disturbances such as fishing, (iii) long term change and variability in reef assemblages.

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    Redmap is a primarily a website that invites the community to spot, log and map marine species that are uncommon in their region, or along particular parts of their coast. The information collected is mapped and displayed on the site, demonstrating, in time, how species distributions may be changing. Sightings are divided into two categories – those with a photo that can be ‘verified’ by a marine biologist, and sightings without photos that we call community sightings (anecdotal). All the information collected, with and without photos, is mapped and will be used in the following years to map out a ‘story’ of changes occurring in our marine environment. The main data collected includes the species sighted (normally selected from a list comprising preselected species of interest), the location, date/time and activity being undertaken. Other optional information gathered include biological data such as sex, size and weight and environmental data such as water depth and temperature and habitat. This record is associated with live data (and will subsequently change over time). Note that the accuracy of spatial elements has been reduced for distribution purposes. This data set is also subject to a three year embargo (ie. does not contain data less than three years old). If you wish to discuss obtaining a citable, static dataset, that is current and/or contains precise spatial elements, please see Point of Contact.

  • The data is quantitative abundance of fish and megafaunal invertebrates and algal % cover derived from transect based counts at a wide range of locations across Temperate Australia. The methods are described in detail in Edgar and Barrett (1997). Primarily the data are derived from transects at 5 m depth and/or 10 m depth at each site surveyed. Methods were initially developed for research on temporal changes following protection in Tasmanian long-term MPAs (Maria Is, Tinderbox, Ninepin Point, Governor Island). These data are temporally replicated (year scale).

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    This record describes the outputs of two different modelling exercises that were used to characterise the seafloor habitats for temperate Australian waters. The modelled area includes all shelf waters (<250m depth) in southern Australia south of the Tropic of Capricorn. Bioregional benthic habitat maps were constructed using (1) the Geoscience Australia 250m 2023 grid (ref); (2) ground-truthing observations derived from horizontally facing imagery from stereo-BRUV and BOSS camera systems; and (3) several physical datasets as covariates in model development (all oceanographic variables smoothed to 250m resolution). Source data is available from Geoscience Australia's eCat: https://doi.org/10.26186/148758 (bathymetry), Squidle+: (benthic imagery annotations), and (3) AODN Portal: https://portal.aodn.org.au/search (IMOS oceanographic datasets). The specific subset of GA observations used in this modelling exercise is available from https://github.com/UWA-Marine-Ecology-Group-projects/nesp-2.1/blob/main/data/tidy/NESP-2.1_broad-habitat.csv. See the NESP Mac Project 2.1 final report for a description of the sampling design for ground-truthing observations and annotation technique. -----Functional Reef model (binomial)----- This model discriminates ‘functional reef’ from sediment (non-reef) ecosystem types. Functional reef is defined by this project as “any seabed area functioning as a reef, which may include dense beds of sessile invertebrates or molluscs”. This term was chosen because much of the continental shelf is dominated by sediment yet is stable enough to support emergent sessile biota that provide structure and resources for “reef-affiliated” species. The modelling approach uses a Bayesian representation of a Binomial generalised linear model. For ground-truthing benthic annotations, the following benthic categories were collapsed into the ‘functional reef’ classification: sessile invertebrates, bare rocky reef (consolidated), macroalgae, Amphibolis spp. and Thalassodendron spp. All other benthic classifications were assigned to the ‘non-reef’ category. -----Ecosystem Component model (multinomial)----- This model discriminates between five broad habitat types (hereafter ‘ecosystem components’): seagrass, macroalgae, sessile invertebrates, bare consolidated substrata, bare unconsolidated substrata. The modelling approach uses a Bayesian implementation of a Multinomial generalised linear model. For ground-truthing benthic annotations, benthic annotations for mobile species (e.g. echinodermata) were discarded. All remaining annotations were collapsed into the five broad ecosystem components. A selection of mapping (WMS) services are listed in the 'Downloads & Links' section of this record. See the 'Lineage' section for a full description of the data packages available for download, and for more visualisation options.

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    The main aim of this research program was to determine the potential for reducing the density of urchins to encourage the return of seaweeds and an improvement in urchin roe quality and quantity from remaining urchins. Tasmanian Sea Urchin Developments used two widely-separated sub-tidal experimental lease areas. One of these areas was at Meredith Point, on the east coast, and the other at Hope Island, on the south coast. Both sites had been subject to some overgrazing by urchins. At Meredith Point, the study area was divided into plots containing urchins at three densities: artificially enhanced, continually harvested and control (undisturbed). At Hope Island, controlled clearings of urchins and limpets from barrens areas were conducted. Recovery of vegetation was monitored as well as urchin roe quality and quantity. The data represented by this record was collected at Hope Island, and includes results from an inital survey collected at the site before the main study commenced.