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underwater cameras

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    In 2014, UniDive (The University of Queensland Underwater Club) conducted an ecological assessment of the Point Lookout Dive sites for comparison with similar surveys conducted in 2001 - the PLEA project. Involvement in the project was voluntary. Members of UniDive who were marine experts conducted training for other club members who had no, or limited, experience in identifying marine organisms and mapping habitats. Since the 2001 detailed baseline study, no similar seasonal survey has been conducted. The 2014 data is particularly important given that numerous changes have taken place in relation to the management of, and potential impacts on, these reef sites. In 2009, Moreton Bay Marine Park was re-zoned, and Flat Rock was converted to a marine national park zone (Green zone) with no fishing or anchoring. In 2012, four permanent moorings were installed at Flat Rock. Additionally, the entire area was exposed to the potential effects of the 2011 and 2013 Queensland floods, including flood plumes which carried large quantities of sediment into Moreton Bay and surrounding waters. The population of South East Queensland has increased from 2.49 million in 2001 to 3.18 million in 2011 (BITRE, 2013). This rapidly expanding coastal population has increased the frequency and intensity of both commercial and recreational activities around Point Lookout dive sites (EPA 2008). Habitats were mapped using a combination of towed GPS photo transects, aerial photography and expert knowledge. This data provides georeferenced information regarding the major features of each of the Point Lookout Dive Sites.

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

  • This data is part of the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water".

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    This record describes data collected for the 2013 report "Synthesis of seagrass mapping studies conducted by the Water Science Branch of the Department of Water". This project record provides linkage to each of metadata records describing seagrass data collected from the 11 study areas: Beaufort Inlet (2009), Hardy Inlet (2008), Irwin Inlet (2009), Leschenault Estuary (2009), Oyster Harbour (1988, 1996, 2006), Princess Royal Harbour (1996, 2006) Stokes Inlet (2009), Swan Canning (2011), Walpole Nornalup Inlets (2009), Wellstead Estuary (2009), Wilson Inlet (2007, 2008). To access the source datasets from each study site/sampling occasion in their original (unaggregated) form, see child records linked to this parent record.

  • The Marine Futures Project was designed to benchmark the current status of key Western Australian marine ecosystems, based on an improved understanding of the relationship between marine habitats, biodiversity and our use of these values. Approximately 1,500 km2 of seafloor were mapped using hydroacoustics (Reson 8101 Multibeam), and expected benthic habitats "ground-truthed" using towed video transects and baited remote underwater video systems. Both sources of information were then combined in a spatial predictive modelling framework to produce fine-scale habitat maps showing the extent of substrate types, biotic formations, etc. Surveys took place across 9 study areas, including Jurien Bay. The Jurien Bay marine environment is highly diverse, and is home to a wide variety of species, including sea lions and sea birds on the many offshore islands. Limestone reef and seagrass habitats in the area support a diverse fish and invertebrate fauna, and a local crayfishing industry is based around the Western Rock Lobster (Panulirus cygnus).