Keyword

connectivity

6 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
From 1 - 6 / 6
  • Google Earth KMZ files of hammerhead sharks tagged with Wildlife Computers miniPAT archival tags and SPOT6 tags. Files of animals tagged with MiniPAT tags include an MELE polygon, which is the 'Maximum extent of location estimates', that is, a polygon enclosing all position estimates at the maximum error level (100 km). Collectively, movements are restricted within state waters with no hammerheads moving across state or International boundaries.

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project A5 - "Defining connectivity of Australia’s hammerhead sharks". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- Hammerhead sharks are the focus of conservation management through recent listing on Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS). The clear data gap for Department of the Environment and Energy (DoEE) and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) is connectivity of populations across national and international jurisdictions. This project applies genetic and satellite telemetry to examine the movement and connectivity of hammerhead sharks. This will help determine use of Australian Marine Parks (AMPs) and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), and define Biologically Important Areas (BIAs) where possible. These data will be assimilated with current research to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the status of hammerhead shark populations to inform species listing and assist management and conservation policies at national and international levels. Planned Outputs • A report outlining the results of genetic and movement analysis of hammerhead shark populations in northern Australia, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea including identification of BIAs (aggregation sites) and use of CMRs where possible; revised conceptual models of stock structure and species status assessments; and a summary of Indigenous knowledge and traditional use of hammerhead sharks. • Presentation of results to key stakeholders and end users • Policy Brief (Research Summary for Managers) that describes project outcomes • Manuscripts for scientific journals outlining the results of project components (eg, genetics, movement, Indigenous use and knowledge transfer) • Presentation of recommendations at scientific conferences • Communication of findings to the broader community via social media

  • CSV files of location data (position estimates) for hammerhead sharks tagged with Wildlife Computers miniPAT archival tags and SPOT6 tags. Note that miniPAT data estimates may be up to 100 km (Kevin Lay, Wildlife computers pers comm). Location estimates from archival miniPAT tags also need to be considered against ARGOS location classes (see http://www.argos-system.org/manual/3-location/34_location_classes.htm). Collectively, movements are restricted within state waters with no hammerheads moving across state or International boundaries.

  • This data describes various acanthocephalan, nematode and helminth parasites identified on elasmobranchs caught between 2015 and 2018 at a number of sites around Australian. All parasite and host data is contained with tables in publications linked to this record (see Supplementary Information and Online Resources section).

  • This record provides an overview of the scope and research output of NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub Project D4 - "Expanding our spatial knowledge of marine biodiversity to support future best-practice reviews". For specific data outputs from this project, please see child records associated with this metadata. -------------------- This project will fill data gaps and evaluate methods relevant to the ongoing spatial management of seafloor biota across the Australian marine domain. The objective is to prepare Australian, State and Territory governments for future best-practice reviews of Australia’s marine bioregionalisation that can be used to improve marine spatial planning and management initiatives (e.g. marine bioregional plan and marine protected area reviews, environmental impact and natural heritage assessments). The project will incorporate results from field trips to unexplored offshore areas of Australia’s marine domain and communicate biodiversity values of the AMP network to the Australian public. Planned Outputs • Report evaluating the usefulness of phylodiversity (genetic diversity) to spatial marine planning • Report outlining extensions of known statistical approaches to be able to utilise available mixed-resolution biological data (including museum and historical data) for the production of best-evidence bioregional maps • Report evaluating the usefulness of connectivity (current) models to spatial marine planning • Report including description and images of deep-sea biological communities of the east coast, including the CMR network, on a scheduled November 2016 expedition of the NMF ‘Investigator’ (mid 2016-7). This survey will result in significant media opportunities to promote the values of the CMR network. • Report including description and images of banks, seamounts and pelagic aggregations within the Cocos Keeling/Christmas Island territories. This would require a successful application for ship-time on the NMF ‘Investigator’ • Report investigating the possibility of downscaling biogeographic maps to the typical scale of areas of conservation concern (1-100 km) by utilising emerging fine-scale bathymetry (provided by the shelf mapping project), acoustic and water movement data

  • Meta data of all tagged hammerhead sharks detailing tag dates, locations, and shark biological details.