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EARTH SCIENCE | BIOSPHERE | ECOSYSTEMS | MARINE ECOSYSTEMS | COASTAL

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  • This dataset comprises summaries of sight and resight data compiled for the NESP MBH project A13 and derived from data housed in the Australian Right Whale Photo Identification Catalogue (ARWPIC) and associated effort summaries. These summaries have been compiled as part of an analysis of mark recapture information in establishing trends in the population and spatial connectivity of individuals across southern Australia. The summaries are based on original sightings data collected across 1990-2018 by ARWPIC partners. The ARWPIC is housed at the Australian Antarctic Division and managed by the Australian Marine Mammal Centre.

  • A review of peer-reviewed publications was undertaken, focusing on coastal and marine microplastics relevant to South Eastern Australia (South Australia, Victoria, and New South Wales), as well as from ongoing citizen science programmes from AUSMAP. This dataset summarises basic information about the microplastics studies: the location of the study; if the study focused on water, sediment or biota; the type of biota (for biotic studies); and the DOI of the publication. Although the primary focus of this study was restricted to southeastern Australia, studies collated from other regions have also been included in this dataset. The outcomes of the literature review for other regions (QLD, NT, SA, WA, Tas) should not be considered comprehensive.

  • Tidal wetlands are vulnerable to accelerated rates of sea-level rise projected by climate models. The Surface Elevation Table (SET) is a technique applied globally to assess the extent of vertical adjustment of tidal wetlands to sea-level rise over decadal timescales. This record describes the SET data from the Australian network (OzSET). This data can be used for analyzing wetlands elevation change at the study sites

  • This data is from the 2021 Seeds for Snapper season which is a community volunteer seed based seagrass restoration program located in Perth, Western Australia. It details the effort that went into the collection of Posidonia australis seagrass fruit including number of divers, number of shore support personnel, volunteered hours, and fruit collection metrics (volume, estimated number).

  • These files contain the data recorded from a mesocosm experiment conducted in Bergen, Norway 2022 which assessed the effect of simualted mineral-based (silicate or calcium) ocean alkalinity enhancement (OAE) on diatom silicification. Ten mesocosms were used in total, divided into two groups either the silicate- or calcium based group and alkalinity was increased by either 0, 150, 300, 450 or 600 µmol L-1 above natrually occuring levels. The PDMPO-fluorescence (an appropriate proxy for silicification) of diatoms was recorded on eight seperate days during the experiment. Accompanying data includes measured; macronutrients (nitrate, nitrite, phophate, silicate), total alkalinity, biogenic silica in the water column and sediment trap.

  • In March 2020 UWA and the Malgana Rangers transplanted by hand 36 pieces of Posidonia australis and Amphibolis antarctica into nearby restoration plots at Dubaut Point, Shark Bay. In March 2022 UWA went back to assess survival and shoot growth which is detailed in this dataset.

  • The effect of ocean alkalinity enhancement on a coastal phytoplankton community was assessed via a microcosm experiment. The effect of alkalinity enhancement in two scenarios (i) when enclosed seawater was in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and (ii) when enclosed seawater was not in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 were explored. Alkalinity was increased by ~497 umol/kg in these two treatments and plankton communities, carbonate chemistry, dissolved inorganic nutrients, particulate matter and chlorophyll a dynamics monitored over a 22 day period where a spring bloom occurred.

  • The Seamap Australia National Benthic Habitat Layer (NBHL) is a nationally synthesised database of seafloor habitat data, classified according to the Seamap Australia National Benthic Habitat Classification Scheme (https://vocabs.ardc.edu.au/viewById/129). In generating the Seamap Australia NBHL, datasets from data providers around Australia are collated and centrally hosted by IMAS (UTAS). Through time, some datasets become superseded by newer, more accurate data for the same region (improved data collection or processing methodology). This record aggregates all habitat datasets that have been collated as part of the Seamap Australia project, but are no longer considered the most accurate/up to date habitat for a particular region and have been superseded by another product. The parent record for the Seamap Australia NBHL provides an aggregation point for all "current" habitat datasets: https://metadata.imas.utas.edu.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog.search#/metadata/4739e4b0-4dba-4ec5-b658-02c09f27ab9a

  • Baited remote underwater stereo-video (stereo-BRUV) were used to sample the fish assemblages of the Hunter Marine Park and adjacent Port Stephens - Great Lakes Marine Park at equivalent depths. Stereo-BRUV were deployed in both autumn and spring from spring 2016 to autumn 2018 and at depth of 32-105m. The videos were analyse to all fish species to the lowest taxonmic level and estimate relative abundance (MaxN) and lengths of all species. This information was used to form a baseline of the benthic fish assemblages of the Hunter Marine Park. This study was done as part of the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub D3 project (https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/project/project-d3-implementing-monitoring-amps-and-status-marine-biodiversity-assets-continental).

  • Ecosystem data was collected as part of an integrated study of the continental shelf over a 2 and a half year period between November 2015 and January 2018. Data were collected bi-monthly through the spring to autumn (November, January, March, May). Stations were situated perpendicular to shelf bathymetry, ranging in depth from ~50 m to 100 m near the edge of the shelf and were located between 5 km and 15 km from land; encompassing from south Storm Bay, past the southern tip of Bruny Island and into the Southern Ocean (south-east Tasmania, Australia). Data collected focused on each trophic level, characterizing the zooplankton community, fish schools and marine predators. The overarching aim of the study was to investigate the effects of long term warming, and a marine heatwave event on zooplankton dynamics in terms of community response variables and the flow-on effects of changing lower-trophic level dynamics for top predators.