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EARTH SCIENCE | BIOSPHERE | ECOSYSTEMS | MARINE ECOSYSTEMS | REEF | CORAL REEF

5 record(s)
 
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  • Meta data of all tagged hammerhead sharks detailing tag dates, locations, and shark biological details.

  • Coral community transect data collected concurrent with coral disease surveys in in the vicinity of Hoga Island in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Three replicate 20 m transects were collected by divers in each of reef flat, crest and slope habitats in 2005 (four sites, point intersect transect data), 2007, 2010 and 2011 (all six sites, line intersect transect data). For further detail see: Haapkylä, J., A. S. Seymour, J. Trebilco, and D. Smith. 2007. Coral disease prevalence and coral health in the Wakatobi Marine Park, south-east Sulawesi, Indonesia. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK 87:403. Haapkylä, J., R. Unsworth, A. Seymour, J. Melbourne-Thomas, M. Flavell, B. Willis, and D. Smith. 2009. Spatio-temporal coral disease dynamics in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, South-East Sulawesi, Indonesia. Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 87:105–115. Haapkylä, J., J. Melbourne-Thomas, and M. Flavell. 2015. The association between coral communities and disease assemblages in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, south-eastern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Marine and Freshwater Research.

  • In situ time-lapse photography was used to characterise movement and feeding preferences of the Pacific crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris) in the northern and southern Great Barrier Reef in 2015. This record describes the data accompanying the publication (in press): Homing behaviour by destructive crown-of-thorns starfish is triggered by local availability of coral prey. Data files are: 1) CoTS movement and behavioural observations 2) CoTS individual movement tracks (per image) from time-lapse photography 3) feeding electivity on coral species by CoTS from time-lapse photography

  • The Seamap Australia spatial data layer is a nationally synthesised data product of seafloor marine habitat data. Australian continental shelf benthic habitat layers in GIS format were collected from various stakeholders around the country. Through compiling all of these data sets, we established a controlled vocabulary, reviewed by ANDS and external independent assessors, to produce a national classification of marine habitats. This national marine habitat classification scheme complements work undertaken by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub (Theme D). The Seamap Australia product is of national importance and highlights the diversity of benthic habitats around our marine estate. This is the first edition of a seafloor marine habitat data layer that seamlessly brings together data from each of Australia’s state and territory marine habitat databases. Seamap Australia is a constantly evolving product as we continuously improve our skills in standardising, collating and sharing marine spatial data. This record describes a static version of the Seamap Australia national data layer as of 28/11/2018. The most current version of the data is available from the Seamap Australia website [http://seamapaustralia.org/map]. We envisage that the 'live' product will be constantly developed and updated as future surveys continue to improve our knowledge of our vast marine estate.

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    The Seamap Australia spatial data layer is a nationally synthesised data product of seafloor marine habitat data. Australian continental shelf benthic habitat layers in GIS format were collected from various stakeholders around the country. Through compiling all of these data sets, we established a controlled vocabulary, reviewed by ANDS and external independent assessors, to produce a national classification of marine habitats. This national marine habitat classification scheme complements work undertaken by the National Environmental Science Program (NESP) Marine Biodiversity Hub (Theme D). Seamap Australia data can be visualised, analysed and downloaded from the Seamap Australia website. The Seamap Australia website demonstrates how this data can be complemented with existing data from BRUVS (Baited Remote Underwater Video Units), AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicles), Reef Life Survey and other spatial marine data sets. The Seamap Australia data layer, and all component datasets collected from stakeholders for the purposes of this project, is additionally available for download from other external data portals, namely Research Data Australia, and the AODN and IMAS Data Portals. The Seamap Australia product is of national importance and highlights the diversity of benthic habitats around our marine estate. This is the first edition of a seafloor marine habitat data layer that seamlessly brings together data from each of Australia’s state and territory marine habitat databases. We encourage users to consider this dataset Version 1 in a larger attempt to continuously improve our skills in standardising, collating and sharing marine spatial data. We envisage that this product will be constantly developed and updated as future surveys continue to improve our knowledge of our vast marine estate.