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  • The data describes number of vessels, engine power, gross tonnage and fishing effort by year (1950-2017), targeted functional group, and fishing gear. Fishing effort estimates were derived from country-level fishing fleet capacity data publicly available, following the method described in Rousseau et al (2019; https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1820344116) and methods improvement reported in Rousseau et al. (in prep). The data coverage is global, but estimates are given at the Exclusive Economic Zone-, Large Marine Ecosystem-, and Food Agriculture Organisation-level. The data was collected for a wide range of uses, including to inform global and regional marine ecosystem models and to understand the long-term evolution of fishing and its socio-ecological implications in the global ocean.

  • It is recognised that Indigenous communities are likely to be impacted by Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) wind farm developments. This work conducted a desktop study to identify Traditional Owner interests in areas adjacent to current ORE development areas. The purpose of the work was to gauge the extent of existing knowledge on cultural values and list appropriate avenues for future engagement with Traditional Owners to better understand the potential impact of ORE developments. This included identifying existing Sea Country plans for these communities, identifying existing information on cultural values, investigating Indigenous Cultural Intellectual Property, and further notes on preferred methods of engagement for these Indigenous communities potentially impacted by ORE developments. This raw spreadsheet of compiled information is withheld due to cultural sensitivities, but a synthesis of information will be available in the Project 3.3 final report once finalised (estimated May-June 2024). Please contact the NESP Data Wrangler (Southern node) to discuss access to the raw spreadsheet of information: Emma.Flukes@utas.edu.au

  • 1. Workforce Tasmania’s commercial fishing industry workforce is defined as those people engaged in economic activity (work) within the sector across or at a given time, either in paid employment or self-employment. For fisheries this includes skippers and crew employed as sub-contractors and paid on a share of catch arrangement. It can include people engaged in unpaid work undertaken as part of these activities, although this has not been included in this assessment. Monitoring workforce changes is important because these changes indicate changes in social and economic benefits at a statewide and regional community level. Factors which affect workforce size include the extent to which a policy of maximizing technical efficiency is pursued through management, which typically reduces the fleet size and therefore the number of people employed. Other factors include the level of stock availability and access, the cost of entry into the fishery, and the financial profitability of fishing. Because of these factors, many fishers are engaged in employment in multiple fisheries or other marine sectors in order to supplement fishing incomes and pursue full-time employment. 1.1. Abalone The commercial harvesters catching abalone species operate within the Tasmanian Abalone Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. The data provided for this fishery is for the Tasmanian Abalone Fishery as a whole, which includes harvesting activity for this species as well as all other species caught in this fishery. 1.2. Commercial Dive species The commercial harvesters catching these species operate within the Tasmanian Commercial Dive Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. The data provided here is for the Tasmanian Commercial Dive species as well as all other species caught in this fishery. 1.3. Giant crab species The commercial harvesters catching giant crab operate within the Tasmanian Giant Crab Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. 1.4. Scalefish species The commercial harvesters catching this scalefish species operate within the Tasmanian Scalefish Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. The data provided here is for the Tasmanian Scalefish Fishery as a whole, which includes harvesting activity for this species as well as all other species caught in this fishery. 1.5. Scallop species The commercial harvesters catching species of scallop operate within the Tasmanian Scallop Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. 1.6. Southern rock lobster The commercial harvesters catching southern rock lobster operate within the Tasmanian Rock Lobster Fishery. Assessment of workforce indicators is undertaken at fishery level. 2. Workforce Indicators 2.1. Persons Workforce size (the total number of people directly employed) includes both skippers and crew, and those employed full time and part time. 2.2. Employment FTE The number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) positions in each fishery is also estimated. This indicator shows that while a higher number of people may be employed in a fishery, some of these jobs may be part-time. Therefore, the number of FTEs is typically lower than the number of people in the workforce. In this iteration of the dataset, this value is unavailable for the abalone fishery in 2016, 2017, and 2019, and does not apply to the scallop fishery in any of the years available (2016-2020). 2.3. Active Supers The number of supervisors (skippers) employed in the fishery. 2.4. Harvest Units (TAS HP) The number of harvest units (combination of licensed vessel and fishing entitlement) active in a fleet and the number of people who actively harvest fish as supervisors (skippers) in a commercial fishery are directly linked to the size of the workforce in each fishery. In many cases, multiple supervisors may be linked to the same harvest unit, so the number of supervisors is often higher.

  • This data presents the economic contribution of six key fisheries and aquaculture production sectors to the Tasmanian economy. These six fisheries are: - Tasmanian Rock Lobster Fishery; - Tasmanian Abalone Fishery; - Tasmanian Scalefish Fishery; - Tasmanian Salmonid Aquaculture; - Tasmanian Pacific Oyster Aquaculture; and - Tasmanian Abalone Aquaculture. The economic contribution of these fisheries are measured through the following indicators: - Gross Value Added (GVA) - Contribution to Household Income - Number of persons employed - Contribution to the total full-time equivalent (FTE) workforce The work was undertaken by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania in collaboration with BDO and builds on the foundations and approach set out in 2017/18 National Fisheries and Aquaculture Industry Contributions Study (FRDC 2017-210). To generate the values for the indicators listed above, the framework recommended in Australian Fisheries and Aquaculture Industry: Economic Contributions Estimates - Practitioner Guidelines 2019 (IMAS 2020) was applied. For the analysis in this report, the contribution of immediate processing or farm gate retail activity is not included. The estimates are based on the best available information at the time of writing and apply input-output modelling (developed by BDO) that uses the economic profiles and conversion to basic prices as provided by IMAS. The study was conducted to contribute to the measuring and monitoring of the contribution of Tasmania’s seafood production activities to the economic prosperity and wellbeing of Tasmanians. Understanding the economic contribution of the seafood processing sector is a significant area for further research in advancing our knowledge of the economy broadly associated with fishing and aquaculture in Tasmania.